The day started with a presentation of Melvin Miles, who showed some highlights from the research of Martin Fleischmann. He also touched base a little on those institutes and persons that worked against Cold Fusion back in the days. (Ex MIT, Caltech, Harwell)

Violante Vittori (ENEA) then spoke about heat production in Palladium Research. He gave thanks to National Instruments who had provided some equipment, and also mentioned another “anonymous group” who had provided some systems for them. (DWC and Electrochemical Setup) Violante referred to the anonymous group as XXXX. As Violante himself pointed out we should not keep secrets from each other I was hoping someone would ask some non Palladium related questions such as: “Does XXXX stand for “CERN” or the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation?

 

 

David Kidwell rounded of the morning session speaking about Gas Loaded systems and “Funky Heat”.  To my amusement Francesco Celani raised his voice and questioned High Temperature Vs Low Temperature experimentation. “We need something commercial, and in order to get that we need to work with higher temperatures!” David responded, in a very professional manner(kudos), that in his opinion, you do not need to work with high temperatures to do theoretical research, he then took his point further saying that if we work with high temperature research no funding would be given and Cold Fusion Research would simply “die out due to lack funding”.

 

Its a topic for a interesting debate, especially considering that this is a conference sponsored by a Semiconductor Company.  I spoke yesterday to Srinivasan, he said that in India, there is no problem with Cold Fusion being controversial. If anyone from India wants to know how to apply for funding there from the government, just speak to him and he will push you in the right direction.

 

 

mitsubishi, lenr japan,

 

 

Some loose thoughts so far:

In LENR science – work typically goes into explaining the mechanisms on a subatomic level, while in LENR+  the work goes into making sure that devices can withstand the extreme excess heat created by the subatomic reactions.

Being more interested myself in the engineering and commercial aspects of Cold Fusion – I have to pinch my own arm some times remembering that this is the event for Condensed Matter Nuclear Science – which is not necessarily the same as engineering of useful technology.

Mathematicians often tell me that they love math because its “definite” – “it either works or it dont”.

Well – I am not so sure about that. It seems that we can create entire worlds using math than can work on a paper, but is very hard to prove in real life. Even for me!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Response to “ICCF19 – Day 2”

  1. Share? David Kidwell may know more about enabling the war on drugs than he does about LENR. Maybe not though, after all he is from MIT and the DoD Navy.

    I find this amusing…

    Quote Dr. Bob

    David Kidwell rounded off the morning session speaking about Gas Loaded systems and “Funky Heat”. To my amusement Francesco Celani raised his voice and questioned High Temperature Vs Low Temperature experimentation. “We need something commercial, and in order to get that we need to work with higher temperatures!” David responded, in a very professional manner(kudos), that in his opinion, you do not need to work with high temperatures to do theoretical research, he then took his point further saying that if we work with high temperature research no funding would be given and Cold Fusion Research would simply “die out due to lack funding”. -end quote

    My thoughts are:

    1) Electrolysis system = low heat, gas loaded = medium heat, hydride system = high heat.

    2) High heat is bringing more funding to this field than any previous year.

    3) High heat provides good data… maybe even better than “funky heat”.

    David A. Kidwell Bio

    Dr. Kidwell received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1978, Magna cum laude. He received his Ph.D. in 1982 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in organic chemistry applying mass spectrometry, NMR, and HPLC to the structural analysis of organic biomolecules. At MIT, for relaxation, he took up assembly language programming on an Apple IIe and wrote several commercial programs as well as designed interfaces to attach other hardware. This cemented his life-long interest in electronics and programming. After MIT, he received an NRC-NRL Post Doctoral Associateship at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the area of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, applying this technology to the detection of drugs of abuse.

    For the initial part of his career at NRL, he worked at developing better screening tests, better immunoassays, and novel mass spectrometric confirmation tests for drugs of abuse in the diverse matrices of saliva, urine, hair, and sweat. Dr. Kidwell was one of the first to propose new mechanisms by which drugs of abuse bind to hair, observe bias in hair testing, and point out the inadequacies of decontamination procedures to remove inadvertent environmental contamination. He is a court certified expert on hair testing for drugs of abuse, a field in which he is well known. He is also known for his work on determining drug use by sweat testing, where like in hair analysis, environmental contamination can play a role in generating false positives.

    As a member of the Surface Nanoscience and Sensor Technology Section of the Surface Chemistry Branch, Dr. Kidwell developed small, multi-diverse sensor packages for deployment in the environment and field use. More recently, continuing with the theme of trace analysis in diverse matrices, he developed an ICP-MS technique for detection of Pr in Pd at the PPQ levels and tested the theory of transmutation of Cs into Pr by LENR. He has constructed a number of instruments and software packages for the study of heat production in LENR experiments and applied them to the study of gas loading. With precision calorimetry, he found unusual results in gas loading using sub-nanometer palladium particles in zeolites or alumina supports where some of the energy evolved during gas loading could not be explained by conventional chemistry. He has published over 80 technical papers and book chapters, made over 100 presentations on his work, and holds seventeen patents.

    LAST YEAR

    Quote David Kidwell ICCF18

    Unfortunately, the poor reproducibility (<6%) prevented discovery of the trigger for this excess heat. In gas loading, palladium nanoparticles are pressurized with deuterium. While the resultant heat is very reproducible, it is much lower than from electrochemical experiments and therefore harder to characterize as unconventional chemistry. In both approaches to LENR only energy (as heat) is produced – neither nuclear products nor transmutations have been firmly established. – end quote

    Quote Ruby Carat, "Kidwell claimed the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has observed no evidence of nuclear products or transmutations from LENR experiments, but they still believe the phenomenon needs further study." – end quote

    Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Research at the Naval Research Laboratory
    D.A. Kidwell, D.D. Dominguez, A.E. Moser, J.H. He, K.S. Grabowski, G.K. Hubler1 C.A. Carosella, C. Cetina, and D.L. Knies
    Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 USA
    NOVA Research, Inc., Alexandria, VA

    Then we have the NAVY LENR Patent Granted

    This U.S. Navy patent transmutes radioactive elements into less harmful elements through a benign “cold fusion” low energy nuclear reaction process. The patent was granted April 16, 2013 for a device and method that shortens the half-life of radioactive materials by increasing their rate of emissions. The process creates high pressure steam for the turbines eliminating the need for refueling of existing nuclear reactor cores.

    Offered by the U.S Navy SPAWAR Technology Transfer folks.

    The U.S. Navy LENR patent is listed under Physical Chemistry. Oddly enough, it is not listed under Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry.

    This technology has been available for licensing purchase for quite some time, they claim transmutation of elements and excellent reproducibility.

    System and method for generating particles US 8419919 B1

    http://www.google.com/patents/US8419919B1

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